Colony student works with Scottish Portal Project

Kathleen Farquhar is from Upper Kintore!
(the article is from a newsletter of the New Brunswick Scottish Cultural Association)

Scottish Portal Project Summer Update

By Spencer Thompson

The New Brunswick Scottish Portal has hired three students for the summer.

The goal of the Portal is to create a comprehensive online database of New Brunswick’s Scottish settlers. Students Kathleen Farquhar and I, Spencer Thompson, from St Thomas University, and Ian Forbes from McGill will be hard at work all summer helping to make the Portal a reality.

Spencer Thompson Ian Forbes and Kathleen Farquhar
Left to right: Spencer Thompson, Ian Forbes and Kathleen Farquhar

NB Archives Home Base

The New Brunswick Archives is our main base of operation. The archive is host to the majority of the information needed, whether it is books, letters, government documents, or photos.

Ian and I have been tasked with combing through New Brunswick Land Petitions looking for Scottish immigrants. Kathleen was tasked with New Brunswick Teacher’s Petitions and has already finished.

James Brown Diary

Kathleen’s job hasn’t stopped there. Kathleen is  looking through the diary of James Brown, an interesting Scottish immigrant who penned such works as the Devil’s Reply to Robbie Burns and an essay about emigration to New Brunswick. James Brown often identified fellow countrymen in his diary sometimes listing where they were from in Scotland or even what year they arrived in New Brunswick. She is creating an index of Scottish immigrants as identified in said diary.

Land Petitions

The Land Petitions Ian and I are looking at will most likely take all summer, but we also have additional work to tackle. Ian is currently transcribing the letters of James Crabb, a young immigrant who came from abroad to look after his ailing uncle.

James Brown, the diarist Kathleen is studying, mentioned James Crabb in his journal. This crossover between the Brown diary and the Crabb Collection makes a fascinating connection between archival documents and collections.

 

Travels of John Mann

I am also responsible for writing a brief summary of the travels of immigrant John Mann, an interesting fellow who held New Brunswick in disdain and went back to Scotland, but returned and settled. I also transcribed the ship list from the Favorite, which brought John Mann and more than 100 others from Scotland to New Brunswick in 1816. This was the first government funded emigration scheme. It would also be one of the last planned 19th Century emigration schemes funded by the New Brunswick provincial government.
The three of us also spend time with the Archives’ photograph collection searching for any images for possible inclusion in the Portal.I think I can speak for all of us when I say that we enjoy our jobs and we hope you enjoy the fruits of our labour when the Portal is complete. I know we’ll be proud of it.

125th Colony Anniversary video

July 18, 1998. Part 1/4 of a VHS video tape. This first part records the church service at the Melville Church in Kincardine. Great music as always! Were you there? Can you spot yourself? Who can you recognize? Who was the behind the camera? Please leave a reply below. Note the playing-time for any specific information you have.


 

July 18, 1998. Part 2/4. Here’s the second installment: Parade and Southern Victoria Pipe Band at Woolastook Park.


 

July 18, 1998. Part 3/4. Here’s the Third installment: Parade on Manse Hill Road.


 

Part 4/4. Here’s the forth and last installment: Gathering Woolastook Park

1949 Programme of Events from the 75th Anniversary of Upper Kintore

1949ScotchColonyprogram

Thanks to Garth Farquhar for sharing this programme with Robert LaFrance on Facebook:

“Courtesy of Garth Farquhar, this is a copy of the actual program handed out in 1949 when Upper Kintore celebrated the 75th year of the arrival of its first colonists in 1874. The first settlers of Upper and Lower Stonehaven (Bon Accord and Kincardine) and Lower Kintore arrived the year before. This month all the Scottish descendants and others are going to celebrate the 140th anniversary of the Scotch Colony itself. Look to the Facebook page of the Scotch Colony for details of the event that takes place in about three weeks. Tours of historic buildings, a barbecue, some Scottish Games demonstrations, and lots more.”

Report re: School Children and Teacher Leave Scotland in 1873

This information was received via email from Lorraine Stewart in Stonehaven, Scotland:
I was on a tour of Aberdeenshire Archives yesterday http://www.aberdeencity.gov.uk/education_learning/local_history/archives/loc_ArchivesHomePage.asp and they had on display the Kintore School Log Book. I was able to look it up for April 1873 and there was an entry that said 14 children (5 families) were leaving for New Brunswick – it didn’t mention any names.

 Another entry (I think on the previous page) mentioned a teacher leaving – Ledingham – I see there were Ledingham’s on the Castalia so he may have been one of them, although it didn’t say that he was going to New Brunswick.

I think the reference would be:

Kintore School Log Book 1867-1899      Ref: ED/GR6S/G40/1/1   April 1873  (??14th April – but I couldn’t be sure – didn’t have any paper at the time to write it down)

 If you wanted a copy of the page/pages I’m sure if you contacted the archives they would be able to copy that for you. Unfortunately I didn’t have my camera with me. You would need to ask for permission if you wanted to put it on the website.

 Aberdeen City and Aberdeenshire Archives
Old Aberdeen House
Dunbar Street
Aberdeen, AB24 3UJ
Telephone: +44 (0)1224 481775
Email: archives@aberdeencity.gov.uk

Hope this is of some interest,

Lorraine

Some Farm Names in the Scotch Colony

Agnes (Allen) Ledingham, wife of John Ledingham, died at their home called “Ledingsdale” (lot 5) in Kintore, Victoria County  in January 1881.

Margaret and David Burns celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary in 1883 at their home “New Eden Cottage” (lot 6) in “New Kincardine Colony.”

Maggie Mavor, daughter of Catherine (Thompson) and Francis Mavor, married Fred Robertson in 1889 at her parent’s home called “Loggie” (lot 6) in Lower Kintore.

In 1876, Ellen (Mitchell) Finnie, age 46, died at “Carron,” (lot 1) in Kintore, New Kincardine. She was the wife of James FINNIE.

In 1892 at “Bon Accord House” in Kincardine (lot 58), Agnes Adam married John Stevenson at her parent’s home.

Jane (Nevin) and Thomas Watt named their Kintore home “Lily Glenn,” (lot 2). (See Duncan MacPhail’s book New Kincardineshire: An Intimate History of the Early Years of a Scottish Settlement in New Brunswick, p. 108)

In 1884 William Bissett, age 77, died at his home, “Bandeau” on lot 128 Upper Kintore.

William Cocker, age 62, widower, and Agnes Petrie, age 52, spinster, were married in 1892 at “Fintray” in Kintore. (Mary Ann Will Cocker, daughter of William and his first wife Mary Anne MacDonald, gave her birth place as Fintray, Aberdeenshire, Scotland on her marriage certificate in 1891.)

Isabella (Bissett) and William McKenzie named their residence “Belmont” (lot 21) in Lower Kincardine. Their daughter Euphemia married Robert Cameron at her parent’s home in 1890.

Historic Churches Host Special Services

As part of the “Gathering of the Scots Festival” this weekend, two special services will be held at local historic churches. On Sunday, May 26, 2013 at 10 AM in Kincardine in the Scotch Colony, Melville Church will host a Commemorative Church Service.

_MG_0099

Interior of Melville United Church, Kincardine

Named after Rev. Peter Melville, an early minister to the Scotch Colony, Melville United Church was dedicated in 1878. Services are held here in the warmer months. The view from the hilltop in front of the church is spectacular.

On Sunday evening, May 26, at 7 PM don’t miss the “Kirking of the Tartans” ceremony at the historic Larlee Creek Church. You are invited to bring a tartan item, if you wish. Continue reading

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