Christmas Past in the Scotch Colony

Jan. 12, 1894, Kincardine Colney [sic], Northern Leader: The Christmas tree which was held in the new hall was a great success. It was estimated that there was over one hundred dollars worth of presents on it. The evening passed very pleasantly with dialogues and recitations until about ten o’clock when tea was passed around and a hearty supper was disposed of, then after a few more dialogues and speeches the presents were disposed of and the fun for the evening closed by singing Auld Lang Sine [sic].

Jan. 4, 1900, Kintore, NB, Northern Leader: A large number from here attended the concert and dance at Kincardine Tuesday evening.
An entertainment and Xmas tree was held in the school room Xmas night. After the program was most ably carried out by all who took part refreshments were served of which all partook and did ample justice. The presents were then distributed from off the tree and all left about twelve o’clock after they had spent a most enjoyable evening.

Dec. 30, 1903, Upper Kintore, NB, Fort Fairfield Review: Several of the young people attended the Christmas tree and dance at Upper Kincardine Friday evening.
On Christmas Eve a Christmas tree and concert was held in the school house. At the concert supper was served by the ladies, after which the tree was stripped of its presents for old and young. On account of the disagreeable weather and the icy roads, the attendance was not as large as it would otherwise have been. But everybody enjoyed themselves thoroughly.

Jan. 11, 1905, Upper Kintore, NB, Fort Fairfield Review: The Sunday school held its Xmas tree in the schoolhouse on Friday evening. The affair was very largely attended, and an interesting program was successfully carried out by the members of the school under the skillful management of their teacher, Miss McCarthy.
Several of our young people attended the Xmas tree at Kilburn and the dance in Kincardine on Monday night.

Jan. 3, 1906, Kintore, NB, Fort Fairfield Review: A concert and Christmas tree was held Friday evening for the Sunday school. Before distributing the gifts, refreshments were serveed. A large number were present and a very enjoyable evening was spent.

Dec. 26, 1906: Kintore, NB, Fort Fairfield Review: A Christmas concert in the hall Christmas eve, also a tree for the children.

Jan. 6, 1909, Upper Kintore, NB, Fort Fairfield Review: A Christmas concert and tree was held in the hall Christmas eve. There were many outsiders in attendance and all report a pleasant time spent.

Jan. 5, 1910, Kintore, NB, Fort Fairfield Review: The Christmas tree and concert held in the hall on Friday evening for the young people was a grand success.

 

140th Anniversary of “Sidonian” Colonists

"Sidonian" 11 April 1874; The "Sidonian" leaves Glasgow. via Callum Stuart, FB Chapman, Cumming, & Duncan Family History, April 12, 2014;

The “Sidonian” leaves Glasgow. (Thanks to Callum Stuart for the clipping.)

The Provincial Archives of New Brunswick provides a list of names and ages of Scottish immigrants who were passengers arriving in St. John, New Brunswick by the Sidonian on May 14, 1874, ending the log with this news item that tells what happened next:

“16 May 1874 – Woodstock, N.B., 15th May -The train with the Scottish immigrants arrived here at half past 4 this afternoon, under the charge of Mr. STEWART. They are now being transferred to the steamer “Ida Whittier”, Capt. Rideout, which leaves at 8 p.m. They will arrive opposite Mr. BEVERIDGE’s at Andover (Victoria Co.) tomorrow forenoon and proceed at once to their future homes, up the Tobique River some seven miles where the settlement commences and extends to New Stonehaven.  ”

About 210 colonists sailed April 30-May 14, 1874, arriving in Andover, New Brunswick about May 16, 1874.

Thirteen-year-old William Cumming tells the story of the voyage across the Atlantic and up the St. John River to Upper Kintore here.

At the 75th anniversary of the Upper Kintore Church on September 1, 1968, it was noted in the church bulletin: “Miss Elsie Innes is the last living survivor, who came over from Scotland in May, 1874 on S. S. Sidonian, with a passenger list of 219, who settled in Upper Kintore, Bon Accord and S. Tilley. She is now 95 years of age, and resides in a Rest Home, Portland, Oregon.”

The Scotch Colony and Burns Night 1919

Published in the Presque Isle, Maine newspaper, Star Herald, Feb. 13, 1919 and is signed at the end of the article by W. L. Duncan

Many years ago, to be exact, in 1873, a Scotch sea captain whose ship plied between Scotland and St. John, on occasion of a voyage when he had some time on his hands in St. John, took a run up the river. Noting the big domain of government wild land he saw on the trip, he conceived the idea of bringing a colony of his neighbors in Old Kincardine across, and settling them in New Brunswick.

Going back home he succeeded in recruiting a colony, secured a grant of land for a settlement, and the movement resulted in transplanting about 400 hardy Scotch people, and their settlement in what is known as the Scotch Colony, a place about 30 miles due east of Presque Isle. Continue reading

40th Anniversary of Rev. Gordon Pringle

Star Herald, Sept. 15, 1932, Washburn, Maine news

Here is a report printed in the Presque Isle, Maine newspaper.

Rev. Gordon Campbell Pringle

Rev. Gordon Campbell Pringle

The fortieth anniversary of Rev. Gordon Pringle’s pastorate at Kincardine colony Presbyterian church, New Brunswick, was observed on Sunday, Sept. 11, at Melville church in the Colony. The Auld Kirk was well filled by Scotch folks from both sides of the line, most of them being former settlers from the Colony. The services were very impressively managed by a number of the minister members of the Presbyterians of Woodstock, N. B., assisted by Rev. Dr. Archibald of Grand Falls. Like Rev. Gordon Pringle himself, most of these men came from the land of the heather. Mr. Pringle was graduated from Edinburgh University (an honor man) in 1891. The next year he came over to Canada and found Kincardine in need of a minister at that time. Needless to say his life of service has shown how well he responded to that need. Mr. Pringle is a son of the Manse, Continue reading

Cherished Memories

_MG_3327Annie (McBeath) Ellis brought this lovely piece from Scotland in 1873.
The serving  dish was part of the display at the Manse during Scotch Fest140 on August 24, 2013.

Annie Hastings (McBeath) Ellis (1839-1919),  bakery worker in Scotland, was a passenger on Castalia along with her husband,  Andrew Ellis, joiner, and son John.

Right background is a spoon dish from the Morton homestead in West Branch, late 1800’s.

Dr. Gordon Pringle’s Shaving Mug

_MG_3328

Rev. Gordon Campbell Pringle (1865 – 1952) arrived in Canada on May 21, 1892. He was ordained Sept. 7, 1892, in the Old Calvin Presbyterian Church, Saint John, New Brunswick. He was inducted as minister in Kincardine in the Scotch Colony in 1896. He received his Doctor of Divinity in 1933. He served the Scotch colony 1896-1952.

“Beloved by a loyal people whom he served for over 56 years”

The shaving mug was part of the display at the former Manse on August 24, 2013 during Scotch Fest140.