Video of the Kincardine Memorial Service, 23 July, 2017

The Upper Kintore Memorial Service will be 2pm, Sunday, 27 August, 2017 at the Upper Kintore United Church.

“Like” the new Facebook Page about Upper Kintore

Garth Farquhar has created a new Facebook Page and is posting “A collection of stories and pictures of Upper Kintore New Brunswick. Upper Kintore was settled in 1874 by Scottish immigrants who came over on the Sidonian”

Please “Like” his page: https://www.facebook.com/UpperKintore/

Garth has also added many points of interest on our Scotch Colony Google Map that identify places in his stories.

View this map in Google Maps. https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?ll=46.68191667674333%2C-67.63556170342184&hl=en&z=11&authuser=0&mid=1FJVCNDbiyv7HmsbPJkIw-L0PAUI

140th Anniversary of “Sidonian” Colonists

"Sidonian" 11 April 1874; The "Sidonian" leaves Glasgow. via Callum Stuart, FB Chapman, Cumming, & Duncan Family History, April 12, 2014;

The “Sidonian” leaves Glasgow. (Thanks to Callum Stuart for the clipping.)

The Provincial Archives of New Brunswick provides a list of names and ages of Scottish immigrants who were passengers arriving in St. John, New Brunswick by the Sidonian on May 14, 1874, ending the log with this news item that tells what happened next:

“16 May 1874 – Woodstock, N.B., 15th May -The train with the Scottish immigrants arrived here at half past 4 this afternoon, under the charge of Mr. STEWART. They are now being transferred to the steamer “Ida Whittier”, Capt. Rideout, which leaves at 8 p.m. They will arrive opposite Mr. BEVERIDGE’s at Andover (Victoria Co.) tomorrow forenoon and proceed at once to their future homes, up the Tobique River some seven miles where the settlement commences and extends to New Stonehaven.  ”

About 210 colonists sailed April 30-May 14, 1874, arriving in Andover, New Brunswick about May 16, 1874.

Thirteen-year-old William Cumming tells the story of the voyage across the Atlantic and up the St. John River to Upper Kintore here.

At the 75th anniversary of the Upper Kintore Church on September 1, 1968, it was noted in the church bulletin: “Miss Elsie Innes is the last living survivor, who came over from Scotland in May, 1874 on S. S. Sidonian, with a passenger list of 219, who settled in Upper Kintore, Bon Accord and S. Tilley. She is now 95 years of age, and resides in a Rest Home, Portland, Oregon.”

1873-1874 Passengers Lists

Edited 17 Apr 2014, added Sidonian list (see tabs at bottom of table)

This is from a transcription of a 1873 newspaper article. The source is the New Brunswick Archives.
http://archives.gnb.ca/Search/NewspaperVitalStats/Details.aspx?culture=en-CA&guid=3368B7DC-A288-4981-AE92-C6FDF1C098EC

I have sorted the list alphabetically by last name. Watch out for errors. I imagine this list has been transcribed many times. As we add data, you may need to scroll within the window to see the bottom.

Perhaps not all passengers became part of the Scotch Colony. Some families left immediately when they saw the conditions in the Colony. Jean Duncan is documenting Scotch Colony families here: http://www.jeanbduncan.com/scotchcolony/index.htm

Jean has added the lot numbers that the settlers occupied. Here’s a map of the Colony’s granted lots http://scotchcolony.ca/2013/05/11/1270/. She is also trying to identify the wives and children.

We welcome your comments.

Geneology Services offered

Lorraine Stewart is a historian in Stonehaven, Scotland, who previously sent us an audio recording of her lecture on the Scotch Colony from Scotland’s perspective (clck here to go to that post). She has completed her studies and is offering her professional services to anyone looking for help with their family history. We thought it would be nice to promote her business. There are some helpful links on her website. Here’s a note we received from Lorraine: Continue reading

Colony student works with Scottish Portal Project

Kathleen Farquhar is from Upper Kintore!
(the article is from a newsletter of the New Brunswick Scottish Cultural Association)

Scottish Portal Project Summer Update

By Spencer Thompson

The New Brunswick Scottish Portal has hired three students for the summer.

The goal of the Portal is to create a comprehensive online database of New Brunswick’s Scottish settlers. Students Kathleen Farquhar and I, Spencer Thompson, from St Thomas University, and Ian Forbes from McGill will be hard at work all summer helping to make the Portal a reality.

Spencer Thompson Ian Forbes and Kathleen Farquhar
Left to right: Spencer Thompson, Ian Forbes and Kathleen Farquhar

NB Archives Home Base

The New Brunswick Archives is our main base of operation. The archive is host to the majority of the information needed, whether it is books, letters, government documents, or photos.

Ian and I have been tasked with combing through New Brunswick Land Petitions looking for Scottish immigrants. Kathleen was tasked with New Brunswick Teacher’s Petitions and has already finished.

James Brown Diary

Kathleen’s job hasn’t stopped there. Kathleen is  looking through the diary of James Brown, an interesting Scottish immigrant who penned such works as the Devil’s Reply to Robbie Burns and an essay about emigration to New Brunswick. James Brown often identified fellow countrymen in his diary sometimes listing where they were from in Scotland or even what year they arrived in New Brunswick. She is creating an index of Scottish immigrants as identified in said diary.

Land Petitions

The Land Petitions Ian and I are looking at will most likely take all summer, but we also have additional work to tackle. Ian is currently transcribing the letters of James Crabb, a young immigrant who came from abroad to look after his ailing uncle.

James Brown, the diarist Kathleen is studying, mentioned James Crabb in his journal. This crossover between the Brown diary and the Crabb Collection makes a fascinating connection between archival documents and collections.

 

Travels of John Mann

I am also responsible for writing a brief summary of the travels of immigrant John Mann, an interesting fellow who held New Brunswick in disdain and went back to Scotland, but returned and settled. I also transcribed the ship list from the Favorite, which brought John Mann and more than 100 others from Scotland to New Brunswick in 1816. This was the first government funded emigration scheme. It would also be one of the last planned 19th Century emigration schemes funded by the New Brunswick provincial government.
The three of us also spend time with the Archives’ photograph collection searching for any images for possible inclusion in the Portal.I think I can speak for all of us when I say that we enjoy our jobs and we hope you enjoy the fruits of our labour when the Portal is complete. I know we’ll be proud of it.

ca. 1890’s Road Work

Men worked with horses and carts to build roads in the Scotch Colony. This  photo from ca. 1890’s in Kincardine, New Brunswick is from the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick and can also be seen here on the group page of Old Photos of Victoria County, NB.KincardineRoadBuilding

Some road building bits:

Burnum Annand and Charles Chapman were injured when blasting the road at Duncan’s Rock in August 1873. Burnum was severely injured and died about a year later, leaving his wife and baby son. He was the Colony’s first casualty and was buried in an unmarked grave. Chapman recovered from his injuries. Continue reading