Plan of New Kincardineshire 1873 Beckwith Map 110917-1

“Plan of New Kincardineshire containing 25,000 acres / by Charles E. Beckwith, D.L.S. [Deputy Land Surveyor]. – 1873. – 1 sketch : pen and ink. The plan gives the names of the settlers, the number of the lot assigned to each, and the number of acres each received (100 or 200 acres). Rivers, streams, and roads are also noted. MC42-MS21-7 B. R. Stevenson fonds, Charlotte County Archives. ”

Note area on right (south) is labeled New Stonehaven, now called Kincardine and Bon Accord further east. The area on the left is labeled Kintore as it is still called.

Jean found the map at the New Brunswick Archives site.

Jean counts 63 lots in the New Stonehaven area with names on them. Of the 63, probably 10 are unmarried sons who qualified for their own 100 acre lot (the lots on the  north side of Kincardine road are 100 acres.)

Were the names written down as families signed up in the (old) Stonehaven, Scotland, newspaper office?

This map was assembled by Bill Duncan from 8 pieces downloaded from the New Brunswick Archives. http://archives.gnb.ca/Exhibits/PlannedSettlements/ImageList.aspx?culture=en-CA&Link=MC42-MS21-7-1of8%7CP29-15&t=Kincardine&title=Perseverance+&p=11&of=14. There is a piece of the map missing (lot 36 in New Stonehaven) on the original scans. The gap I show may exaggerate the distance.

http://archives.gnb.ca/Exhibits/PlannedSettlements/ImageList.aspx?culture=en-CA&Link=MC42-MS21-7-1of8%7CP29-15&t=Kincardine&title=Perseverance+&p=11&of=14

Plan of New Kincardineshire 1873, C. Beckwith.

I’m experimenting with overlaying this map on Google maps satellite photos: http://williamlduncan.com/GoogleMapOverlayAPIBeckwith1873_122217-1.html  Zoom in on the Google map to see any mismatches between the lines on the map image and the edges of the fields visible on the satellites photo.

“Like” the new Facebook Page about Upper Kintore

Garth Farquhar has created a new Facebook Page and is posting “A collection of stories and pictures of Upper Kintore New Brunswick. Upper Kintore was settled in 1874 by Scottish immigrants who came over on the Sidonian”

Please “Like” his page: https://www.facebook.com/UpperKintore/

Garth has also added many points of interest on our Scotch Colony Google Map that identify places in his stories.

View this map in Google Maps. https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?ll=46.68191667674333%2C-67.63556170342184&hl=en&z=11&authuser=0&mid=1FJVCNDbiyv7HmsbPJkIw-L0PAUI

The Scotch Colony and Burns Night 1919

Published in the Presque Isle, Maine newspaper, Star Herald, Feb. 13, 1919 and is signed at the end of the article by W. L. Duncan

Many years ago, to be exact, in 1873, a Scotch sea captain whose ship plied between Scotland and St. John, on occasion of a voyage when he had some time on his hands in St. John, took a run up the river. Noting the big domain of government wild land he saw on the trip, he conceived the idea of bringing a colony of his neighbors in Old Kincardine across, and settling them in New Brunswick.

Going back home he succeeded in recruiting a colony, secured a grant of land for a settlement, and the movement resulted in transplanting about 400 hardy Scotch people, and their settlement in what is known as the Scotch Colony, a place about 30 miles due east of Presque Isle. Continue reading

1873-1874 Passengers Lists

Edited 17 Apr 2014, added Sidonian list (see tabs at bottom of table)

This is from a transcription of a 1873 newspaper article. The source is the New Brunswick Archives.
http://archives.gnb.ca/Search/NewspaperVitalStats/Details.aspx?culture=en-CA&guid=3368B7DC-A288-4981-AE92-C6FDF1C098EC

I have sorted the list alphabetically by last name. Watch out for errors. I imagine this list has been transcribed many times. As we add data, you may need to scroll within the window to see the bottom.

Perhaps not all passengers became part of the Scotch Colony. Some families left immediately when they saw the conditions in the Colony. Jean Duncan is documenting Scotch Colony families here: http://www.jeanbduncan.com/scotchcolony/index.htm

Jean has added the lot numbers that the settlers occupied. Here’s a map of the Colony’s granted lots http://scotchcolony.ca/2013/05/11/1270/. She is also trying to identify the wives and children.

We welcome your comments.

Geneology Services offered

Lorraine Stewart is a historian in Stonehaven, Scotland, who previously sent us an audio recording of her lecture on the Scotch Colony from Scotland’s perspective (clck here to go to that post). She has completed her studies and is offering her professional services to anyone looking for help with their family history. We thought it would be nice to promote her business. There are some helpful links on her website. Here’s a note we received from Lorraine: Continue reading

1872 Prospectus of New Kincardineshire Colony of New Brunswick by William Brown

with reports of directors regarding situation, soil, climate, &c, &c., and a statement of conditions concerning free houses, free grants of land, and assisted passages an online book at Our Roots website. Wm. Brown worked for the Anchor Steamship Line which transported the Scotch colonists. This document is a very interesting if overly-rosy snapshot of life in the Perth-Andover area just before the founding of the colony.